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  1. #91
    Bogger
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    Finished up getting everything hooked up with the drivetrain and the oil pressure sensor. I have a pretty ghetto temporary solution in place for mounting the gauge in the cab, I'll take some pics tomorrow. Before I replaced the axle I took a drive around the neighborhood just to make sure everything was working OK. Max speed is 25 mph in my neighborhood so nothing was going to happen with the axle.

    After getting the axle replaced I set out to take it for a test drive and to start the break in process. I only got maybe a half mile away before I realized I had forgotten to tighten the brake caliper bolts after I replaced the driver axle. Oops.

    Got back home OK and torqued them down. Something I've been doing with all the critical bolts on this rig is marking them with a paint pen to be able to identify visually if anything is coming loose. This is now especially important to me after determining what it was that caused the outer CV boot to pop off the driver front axle. Turns out one of the bolts for the wheel bearing unit had backed out and ended up hitting the clamp for the boot and popped it off. After cleaning up all the grease and getting everything back together, I torqued that bolt down again and checked all the others. Unfortunately all of the bolts for both wheel bearing units were not fully torqued down, which is a bit scary. I'm glad I caught this before anything really bad happened, like losing a bearing/wheel on the highway or something. So those bolts are also marked with a paint pen so that I can make sure they don't come loose later.

    So, after getting the brakes torqued down I set off again for a test drive and to start the break in process. Stopped in a church parking lot to check the fluid level of the transmission which turned out to still be quite low. I knew there was a little bit left in it from when Street Smart did their testing/break in, and I added about 5 quarts to get it started off. My driveway is on a slope though so I couldn't check the level properly, and my garage is now full of my engine stand, hoist, old transmission, and all my tools I've been using. I had the remaining transmission fluid with me (along with coolant and my garden sprayer/oil filler to top off the transfer case) so I put that in but it still was barely registering on the dipstick.

    Headed over to ORielly Auto (tried Autozone first, they were already closed since it was 9:30pm by this point) and picked up a couple more quarts of transmission fluid which was enough to finally get the level topped off. I also topped off my transfer case while I was there. Then I headed out for the rest of the drive. I ended up putting almost 50 miles in tonight and everything went really well. Well, except for halfway through when I started hearing a scraping sound that was speed dependent. Since it was speed related I was relieved it wasn't the engine, and I was pretty sure it wasn't the transmission. I found a parking lot to stop at and took a look around. It turned out to be the brake disk shield which had apparently gotten bent when I was swapping the axle earlier, and it had warped enough to start rubbing against the brake disc rotor. Thankfully I at least still had a multitool in the truck with me and was able to use the can opener to pull the shield away from the disc. After that the rest of the drive went without any issues.

    It drives great, and the transmission shifts wonderfully. My old one was definitely developing some issues so I'm glad I went ahead and replaced it. Only things left now are to get some temporary wiring in place for the oil pressure gauge (right now I'm just jumpering it to the battery terminals) and drive it a bit more and then do an oil change on it. That should get me through until we get to Colorado, then I'll change the oil again while I'm there, then again when we get back home. That will fully complete the break in process and I can switch back to Mobil 1 for my oil (you're supposed to use conventional oil for the break in to make sure everything mates up correctly and to avoid the cylinder walls glazing over).

    It's been a long and tiring and somewhat expensive process, but this rig should last me a long time now. After my trip I can go back to trying to get it all set up for overlanding/camping.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

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    SlcHummer (06-26-2018)

  3. #92
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  4. #93
    Bogger
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    Scheduled the pickup for the old transmission, got the carpet put back in (the floorpan/tunnel gets bloody hot when driving around for a while, especially now that the weather has gotten warmer), and got the transmission loaded into the back of the Alpha to take to work with me tomorrow for the pickup. They charge an additional $200 if it's delivered to a residential address, so forget that.


    Had some weirdness with the starter a couple times today, it sounds like the solenoid isn't staying engaged fully. I'm not sure if it's me flipping the key back too soon or something else going wonky. I'll keep an eye on it, I know the start was replaced just last year so it shouldn't be going out already.


    This morning before work I also picked up the trailer tongue bracket I had welded up and got it painted tonight. I still need to cut the old ball tongue off and get this new one mounted. Once that's done all that will be left is bolting the truck topper onto the trailer and I should be all set for my trip.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

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  5. #94
    Bogger
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    So, no, I didn't die on my trip to Colorado. Though a deer did. Tragic.



    The irony of that was just minutes before it happened my wife and I were discussing what would happen if we hit a deer, since we had already seen quite a few along that stretch of road. She was convinced it would be very bad, I was (mostly) sure the truck would be fine. Fortunately I was right. The worst of the damage was my front spot lights ended up getting their brackets all bent (fixable, but even still they are a $20 pair off Amazon), the fairlead mount on the bumper was pushed back (fixed with a prybar), the top of the winch contactor housing was cracked open (still need to replace that) and my grille had all but two of its mounting points broken. Fortunately the two that are left are sufficient for now until I can replace it. That's really it. Thankfully I had the side bumper pods from Thorparts which helped greatly with protection.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

  6. #95
    Bogger
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    So, a lot has happened since I left for Colorado. The trip itself was good, even with hitting the deer, though I could have done without having to do so much remote work for my company during it.

    Aside from the deer hit, the drive was unfortunately eventful. As I neared my destination I started hearing a tapping noise that grew louder and louder, and I started to notice a definite drop in power. Terrified something was going wrong with the engine, I pushed on and made it to the campsite my family was staying at. The next few days I drove the truck a couple times and while the tapping was still there, it wasn't nearly as loud as the first day. Then came driving from the campsite up to Colorado Springs. Again as I neared my next destination (my parent's house up a canyon south of the Springs) I was suffering terrible noise and power loss, and my engine was starting to get decidedly hot, but not quite overheating.

    The next day I drove into the Springs to get some tools I hadn't brought with me, namely a mechanics stethoscope. I listened to the engine and couldn't find anything really wrong with it, the noise didn't appear to be coming from inside. Considering I just rebuilt the engine due to a trashed lifter I was obviously terrified I had done something wrong. The overheating was a real concern and the only thing I could think of was that it was the fan clutch since it really only got hot while driving slowly after driving at high speeds for a long distances. So I replaced the fan clutch and I might have also replaced the thermostat, I can't really recall if I did that during the engine rebuild or not, but probably during the rebuild.

    That unfortunately did not seem to help much, so I just kept a close eye on it for the rest of the trip. On our way home from Colorado I started noticing that the tapping sound only was audible when I was accelerating, if my foot was off the gas you couldn't hear it. I knew then it wasn't anything internal since you would always hear the tapping, even if it was quieter with no load. The realization finally came that it must be an exhaust leak. We stopped at my sister's in Castle Rock for the night and I checked the bolts on the manifold and couldn't find anything loose. Then I checked the bolts from the manifold to the exhaust pipe and sure enough, the nuts had come loose. I tightened them down and that helped considerably.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

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  7. #96
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    We made it back home the next day without any further issues, though that exhaust leak would continue to be an issue as the nuts kept coming loose. So imagine my frustration when it finally got to the point that no matter what I did the leak wouldn't go away. I kept checking the nuts but I finally had them permanently tightened so it wasn't that anymore. I then figure the noise was due to the doughnut gasket having become damaged or something. Finally about a month ago or so I was driving to work and went to pass some slowpoke and after accelerating hard my truck started to make a terrible racket. At first I was afraid it was the transfer case or something, but when I pulled over and got out to check, I realized it sounded more like a Harley. Looking down into the engine bay I noticed the insulation on the firewall was blowing around, and realized it was an exhaust leak. I couldn't figure out how it was leaking so badly, until I got underneath to try and get a better look.



    Yeah, that shouldn't be just hanging there like that.

    Turns out the threads for the O2 sensor had gotten buggered up somehow and it finally just blew out, though initially I thought it had just backed out somehow. I just happened to have pulled over just a few hundred feet from a NAPA so I drove over and borrowed some tools from a nice bloke that was also there to pick up some parts and that's when I learned the threads were damaged when I inspected the sensor more closely. Unfortunately I didn't have my own tools with me as I had been planning on doing the electrical to the rear and had the back all empty.

    So I bought a new sensor and tried to install it, just to find the threads on the bung were buggered up as well. So then it was over to Master Muffler (which was also fortunately very close by) and left it with them for the day to repair the bung and get it all put back together for me. I just wish I had noticed it when I had the engine out as it would have been a lot easier and cheaper to fix it then. But hey, at least now I know why I continued to have an exhaust leak. Now it's much, much quieter and the power is back to where it should be. It's amazing how much an exhaust leak can wreck your power levels.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

  8. #97
    Bogger
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    So I really haven't been able to work on the H3 much this summer thanks to work being a nightmare. We've now gone through two guys that were supposed to replace my old coworker, but both of them were fired after three months each. The last one was more than a waste of time, he was downright almost destructive. I'm a Linux sysadmin so for those that don't know what that is I manage a bunch of web servers that various websites are hosted from, most of which are commercial sites so downtime is extremely bad. It's hard enough trying to manage a data center by yourself (we have about 250 servers or so and right now I'm the only sysadmin), but throw into that someone who not only doesn't know what they are doing but is also convinced they do and they even think they know how to do the job better than you, even though it's painfully obvious they don't, and you have a recipe for disaster. Thankfully we've learned our lesson and are being a lot more stringent on who we hire, but it's made this year an absolute nightmare for me.

    Anyway, now that you have an idea of why I haven't kept this more up to date as well as why I haven't been able to get much done on the Alpha, let's move on to what is currently under way.

    A couple weeks ago I got the bug to start working on the Alpha again, hopefully to finally start getting around to doing the rear electrical especially now that it's finally started cooling off outside. Something that got me thinking was a conversation I had with the guy at Master Muffler when I was picking the Alpha up after getting the O2 sensor fixed. He suggested redoing the whole exhaust to improve the flow and such. I know the passenger side has a couple crimps in the pipe to provide (unneeded) clearance, and the muffler's aren't the best (but they are already Magnaflow from the factory so they aren't terrible by any means either), but I didn't want to go with aluminized steel since it wouldn't take long for the system to rust out, especially with how much salt is used here (having a salt lake and all it's pretty cheap). Aside from the crimps in the passenger side tubes, the system overall is pretty free flowing, and really I think it's just the rear muffler that causes the most back pressure due to the number of bends the exhaust gasses have to make. So I went underneath the truck to look at how the muffler is hooked up, and it's actually nicely setup so that I can just unhook the rear muffler and remove it and then run a tail pipe straight back to the bumper.

    This will do several things for me. One, it will open up the system a bit. Two, it will give me better clearance at the back when coming down from obstacles, I've already squeezed one of the tips a bit during my trip to Moab this past spring. Three, it will give me a good amount of room under the back where the muffler sits to mount equipment like my ARB twin air compressor and maybe a second battery, or even a rear winch. Four, it will drastically reduce how much heat is transferred into the floor of the back. Right now during trips the floor of the rear cargo area can get pretty warm, especially with stuff stacked on it. Since I keep my fridge back there it can cause it to have to run more frequently and longer to keep everything cold. Another benefit will possibly be a nicer sound. There will still be the first muffler that is mounted before the rear axle, so the noise shouldn't be much of an issue. I can always try it out first and see how the sound is before I fully commit to it.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

  9. #98
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    So, while I was under the truck looking at all this and taking measurements and such, I glanced down at one of the shock mounts and discovered a new problem.





    At some point the inner ear for the shock cracked off. The brackets had been modified to give a little bit of additional clearance, but unfortunately the stresses apparently became to much for one of the welds. This would explain the increased noise I've been getting from that rear corner lately. While I could just re-weld it, I decided that it was just time to rebuild the rear suspension. The truck has ~160k miles on it, and a lot of them were probably hard miles, so the suspension has pretty much seen its day. I was planning on refreshing the suspension anyway, this is just a bit sooner than I was hoping.

    Have you ever seen the clip from Malcom in the Middle where the father goes to turn on a light and the bulb is burnt out, and then several scenes later the wife comes home and notices the light is burnt out and asks him if he's going to replace the light bulb? He rolls out from underneath his vehicle which has the engine out and responds "What does it look like I'm doing???" Yeah, it turned out kind of like that (although thankfully I've already rebuilt my engine).

    Since I'm going to replace the leaf spring clamp plates, I should replace the U-bolts as well (technically should not reuse them, even though some do), and since I have those off, I should replace the leaf springs which are also pretty worn and starting to splay apart and have issues. And since I'm doing that, I should replace the rear bump stops as well since I have a pair of new ones in hand already. Oh, and I ought to replace the shackle bushings in the frame, since at least one of them are still pretty old. And I have new urethane bushings for the sway bar. Maybe new shocks too since I'm not entirely sure how old the current ones are, and since I'm doing all this I can get them past the wife without much fuss. Hmm, I really need to replace the outer front differential bushings with the ones from the Outfitter Design kit I have, I already did the center bushing and I'm going to have the truck down for a bit anyway.

    Well that turned into even more work. I tried to see if I could replace them without having to pull the front suspension all apart, but that just is a no-go. So now that I'm having to tear apart the front suspension to replace the diff bushings, I should probably replace the lower ball joints and control arm bushings with the new parts I already had sitting around (got the ball joints with the truck and the bushings are urethane's from Siberian Bushing that I ordered to replace the aging originals). Oh, better swap out that off brand CV axle with the OEM spare I have. And the axle seals since those have been on there for about 4 years already and are starting to weep a bit. Hmm, Upper control arms might be OK, but one of them looks like the bushings are starting to go out, so better replace those now rather than having an issue later, plus I'll end up with trail spares. Oh, new front shocks too, got to keep it all matching. OH, look at that, the UCA bolts are a bit buggered, better replace those as well with greaseable bolts so that they don't seize.

    And so on, and so forth.


    So now I am redoing my entire suspension, both front and rear. Front is getting new OEM axles, Moog UCA's, rebuilt LCA's with urethane bushings, Moog greaseable UCA bolts, AC Delco greaseable sway bar rods, urethane sway bar bushings, Fox 2.0 shocks, new bump stops, and some other minor stuff. Rear is getting new leaf spring clamp plates, U-bolts, bump stops, urethane sway bar bushings, Fox 2.0 shocks, Old Man Emu leaf springs, new shackles with new bolts and frame bushings, and whatever minor stuff comes up. It's a ton of work, and a lot of money, but it's going to end up being better than new when I am done and should make it a lot more enjoyable to drive. It's incredible the difference in ride quality between my 2008 red H3 and this 2008 Alpha H3. The red H3's suspension is in much better shape and is really quite comfortable to drive. The Alpha is definitely showing the 50k+ additional miles it has over my red H3.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

  10. #99
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    Here's something that I wanted to share with everyone since I have only ever been able to find exactly one picture of them on the entire Internet (and I'm pretty darn good at doing searches) and unfortunately that one photo wasn't a very good shot of them.

    These are what actual Old Man Emu leaf springs for the Hummer H3 look like:



    The "military wrap" (which while it will work, I'd have preferred if they brought it up around a bit more to provide better fore-aft retention, but I am assuming they have a reason for doing it this way due to clearance issues):








    More detail of the leaves:






    I have no real idea of how they ride, though the one other person I know that actually has these said they were pretty good. I figure for only a bit more than new OEM stock springs as long as they are as at least as good as OEM then it won't be too bad. The "military wrap" leaves a bit to be desired but it will definitely give me some peace of mind. I wish they had done something similar with the rear of the spring as well, but I guess they must have had a reason for it. At least now if the front top leaf breaks the second leaf will still keep the vehicle supported correctly. I also like that it uses the bolt together clamps which will really help keep the leaves from splaying apart like the OEM's like to do, plus I can easily repair it if needs be at a later date. The OEM clamps that are bent over are next to impossible to work with and really need to be taken to a spring shop to have them remove them and then put new ones on. I also like the shaping of the bottom leaf, it's not just a hard cut bar with sharp edges but actually tapers out to give it better support and be gentler on that second to bottom leaf. I'm looking forward to seeing how these do. I also ordered the Air Lift helper airbag springs to provide adjustable load support when I load the back up with all my gear and when I tow.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

  11. #100
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    What does it look like when you completely remove all of the front suspension on an H3? Like this:





    The gloves are covering the tie rod ends, rain was forecasted and I didn't want them to get wet and start rusting on me. I also plugged up the openings in the axle to keep dust and whatnot out.

    It took me longer than I would have liked to tear that all apart, but it was definitely needed. At least one of the lower ball joints was noticeably loose, I'm sure the other one probably is as well. The bushings were in OK shape, but definitely on their way out, especially the rear bushings for the lower control arms.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

  12. #101
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    I'll tell you what, finally breaking down and buying a 20 ton shop press and an air hammer were a couple of the best decisions I have made yet. Life changing, seriously. What used to involve lots of blood, sweat, tears, fire, and sacrificing to the automobile gods, as well as several hours of your life, has been reduced down to mere minutes of relatively easy work.

    Pressing out the old front bushing:



    Pressing out the rubber from the outer diff bushing:



    Which it turns out I probably didn't need to push out the rubber and inner metal sleeve of the diff bracket bushing, since I was able to just take my air hammer and hit the outer metal sleeve of the bushing from the back and they popped right out. Last time I replaced those bushings it involved an hour or so of burning out the rubber and then slitting the sleeve with a saw, then peeling out the sleeve. Lots of wasted time, and it damages the paint/powdercoating of the bracket.

    Pressing in the new front bushings wasn't too bad either. I knew it was going to be a bit of a challenge due to the shape of the bushing (here is a link to the Siberian Bushing replacement, it's shaped exactly the same as the OEM rubber one and either is a one peice unit: https://www.amazon.com/Bushing-32-06.../dp/B00WJKS2QS ). I took my time because I didn't want to accidentally tear the bushing, but using the grease that was provided and slowly working the lip of the bushing down into arm I was able to relatively easily get them pressed in. It would definitely have been a huge pain to try and do that with a ball joint press.

    Speaking of which, here is the setup I used to press in the new rear lower control arm bushings using the ball joint press I rented from Autozone:



    You do have to have the differential at least unbolted from the sides, I still had the center bolt in place and just pivoted the differential to make room, though on the passenger side it was still a tight fit. I could not get the ball joint press to sit correctly from the outside as the throat of the press is not deep enough. But overall it went together pretty smoothly. You have to measure where the old bushing sat in relation to the cross member as you do not press the bushing all the way in, and if it's not in the right place then it doesn't line up with the front pivot of the arm. Make sure though to not press it in too far, as the outer metal sleeve of the bushing is a bit cone shaped and if it goes in too far and you have to back it out, it probably won't be tight in the crossmember anymore and can cause issues. Better to not press it in far enough, check the alignment with the arm and then press it in further to get it all lined up. I did that on each side and while you'd think a millimeter or so won't make much difference with getting the arm in, it really does.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

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  14. #102
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    I spent a good part of the day Saturday working on re-assembling the front suspension since I wanted to get the front all back together before this week so that I could lift the rear and start working on that (with the driveway on an incline I felt it would be unwise to try and lift the rear of the truck while the front was still on jack stands). The leaf springs were coming in today and I already had pretty much everything else I needed for the rear aside from the shocks which could be installed last. Unfortunately towards the end I realized the bolts for the upper control arms that also serve to adjust camber and caster had a couple at least that were kind of buggered up. I didn't trust whoever I take my truck to get an alignment done to do it properly with them in that state, nor for it to hold the alignment as well as it aught to, so I had to place an order for new bolts through Amazon and they wouldn't arrive until Tuesday.

    So I decided to at least get as much put back together as I could and just wait for the bolts to get in so that I could button it up. I did leave the front shocks off though because I didn't want someone to decide that without the suspension loaded up and a wheel and tire in the way that they were easy pickings and steal them. Our neighborhood isn't bad, but you never know. So all that is left for the front is to install the UCA's, shocks, sway bar bushings and rods, and put the wheels back on. Then I can lift the rear and get that all replaced and get the air bags installed, though those might not come in until next week, but it's not a big deal if they do.

    I guess it's a good thing I haven't sold my red H3 yet, I can drive that while the Alpha has some down time to do all of this work. Unfortunately a lot of it is waiting for parts to come in, but as of this Tuesday I should have everything I need. I'll be glad when it's done as I miss my V8. The I5 is fine for around town, right up until you need to actually get moving quickly, then not so much. But once this work is done there shouldn't be anything major left to deal with aside from the rear axle, or if something that has bene already fixed decides to break again. But that should be pretty unlikely.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

  15. #103
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    Didn't get anything done Tuesday other than taking some pictures in the morning. Here's where I ended up Saturday night:





    I put trash bags over the knuckles to keep the rain off them, since they aren't fully back together yet I didn't want anything that normally isn't exposed to the weather to start rusting and cause issues for me later, like where the UCA ball joint slips into the knuckle, or the axle spindle/hub mating surfaces.

    Here's a closer look of the passenger side so that you can get a better idea of what all is new:



    Also to show that I did in fact take the time to clean off all the mud, dirt, and axle grease that was covering everything when I first started working on this. And if you look at the differential bracket you'll notice I marked the bolts with a yellow paint pen. I have started doing this any time I work on the truck. First is I don't mark them until they have been torqued to spec, so I know that if it has been marked it has been properly torqued down. Second, it allows me to quickly verify that everything is still tight. You really want to be checking everything periodically to make sure it's all still tightened down and this helps immensely. It's easy to see if something is coming loose because even the slightest amount of backing out will be readily apparent with the lines no longer matching up. You might not notice a loose bolt until it's too late, especially on longer and/or rough trips. The paint cleans off easily enough with a wire brush or a quick wipe with some acetone when you have to remove and reinstall them later on for repairs, then just re-mark them after torquing down, and the paint pens are relatively inexpensive. I have three colors to make sure I can easily see the marks, black, yellow, and white. Some people like to use the whole gorilla approach to tightening fasteners, but I have found that if you torque them to the specs provided by the manufacturer you almost never see them back out again later, and you all but eliminate the possibility of stripping something or even shearing off the bolt head or stud. And the next time you need to disassemble something you're not going to be fighting to get it apart if they've been properly torqued. You also have no idea if you're really tightening something enough when dealing with fasteners that require high amounts of torque. A good example are the axle spindle nuts, they need to be torqued to 190 ft/lbs which requires quite a bit of force, even when I'm using my largest torque wrench that has a 24 inch handle I have to really lean on it to get them that tight. So be smart and use a torque wrench and tighten to spec no matter what it is, though inconsequential things can just be tightened "good enough" though you still might be tightening them more than necessary.


    Lastly, here's a picture of the remaining damage from the deer hit:

    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

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  17. #104
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    Forced myself to work on the Alpha some more. I was hoping I could get the front completely buttoned up, but instead I only barely managed to get the passenger side mostly done.



    I still need to set the resting height and tighten down the lower shock bolt, but I won't do that until I get the other side done and can get the front end to settle and onto some level ground.

    It turned out the Fox shocks for the front of the H3 aren't quite long enough to allow full droop, which is pretty ridiculous. To fix this I slipped a half inch thick nut over the top mounting stud (probably a 3/4" nut)to act as a spacer. I know others have run these shocks OK, but I wanted to be sure I wasn't going to have any issues and ended up spending probably an hour checking extended vs compress length, determining the full travel of control arms to see how much shock travel I needed, if the position of the shock travel in relation to the rest of the suspension geometry was going to be ok or if it would be too low, etc, etc. Basically I knew I wanted to lower the shock down so that when I'm going over an obstacle and get full droop on one side (or maybe hitting a bump that puts me airborne) that it wouldn't try to pull the shock apart, and on the flip side I didn't want the shock to become the bumpstop during full compression. I'm fairly confident that I have it right where I need it now and should hopefully not have any issues. The Fox shocks have bumpstops built into them so the compression wasn't as much of a concern as was the shock being pulled apart during full droop.

    You can see the nut at the top of the shock body in this picture:

    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA

  18. #105
    Bogger
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
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    Thanked 454 Times in 306 Posts
    More shots of the finished work. I ordered a kit of grease fitting caps to keep them clean. I never liked the idea of it being possible to force some dirt in when greasing joints, no matter how little it may be. Having the caps on there will help keep the nipples clean, especially since this is going to be taken offroad again and through mud and water and dust and whatnot.











    The driver side will go together quicker since I know exactly what I am doing now. Then the rear still needs to be dealt with. Unfortunately the pair of rear shocks were shipped separately not just from the front pair, but from each other as well. The final shock arrived Wednesday but when I opened it up I discovered that it had been damaged during shipping since they shipped it in just the box Fox packs each shock in, rather than placing it inside another box to help protect it. Something had punctured the box a couple times and put some gouges and possibly a dent in the aluminum shock body. Needless to say I do not want to use it, so I'm waiting for the seller to get back to me on how they are going to make it right. It's already taken over a week and a half for the rear shocks to get to me, and I do not want to have to wait another week and a half for a replacement or something. I can keep using the existing shocks for now until it is sorted out, but I really wanted this all buttoned up before my trip to Colorado next week. I doubt that is going to happen now though unless they overnight or two day me a replacement.
    2008 H3 Alpha
    2008 Victory Red H3

    "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." - General John Stark

    N1JPA


 

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