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4speedfunk
04-30-2013, 06:00 PM
So you want a solid axle in your H3? Grab a GM Dana 44...grab on of these kits...and start cutting!

These hubs come with ABS rings pre-installed and caliper brackets that allow you to bolt your H3 brakes to the Dana 44 of your choice. The brackets accept stock ABS sensors, and the 12mm studs even allow you to keep your stock rotors and lug-nuts. Don't do a hack-job! Don't settle for 70s-era brakes! Keep your ABS, TCS, and Stabilitrac functioning. I have several sets available in large and small bearing versions. For use with GM/Jeep spindles. $400 (including $50 core for 6-lug hubs).

10396

06 H3
04-30-2013, 08:01 PM
Badass product

Gunner_45
05-01-2013, 12:25 AM
Sweet.

ReconH3
05-01-2013, 07:03 AM
Nice! Makes life so much simpler and more affordable. :)



Ex Umbris Venimus

4speedfunk
05-01-2013, 07:27 AM
True. Now if we can just get some of these H3 guys to scatter their stock IFS's all over the trail, and break out the torches...we can get some company! Its lonely out here is SAS-land!

06 H3
05-01-2013, 11:02 AM
I'm waiting for my front end to explode...how long will that take

4speedfunk
05-01-2013, 11:22 AM
Careful what you wish for! -haha

If you wheel as much as you do...it's only a matter of time! Don't intentionally grenade your AAM-7 until you at least have a D44 tucked away in your garage. Might be a good idea to get all your brackets and steering system ahead of time too. If you plan to re-gear...go ahead and get your matching ring & pinion for the 8.6" rear too. All of these items will be needed when the time comes, and anything you can do ahead of time will save you some frustrations. Its never a smooth transition from IFS to SA...you're truck will be down for at least a week, even if you have all this stuff....over a month if you don't.

06 H3
05-01-2013, 11:27 AM
Seeing its my DD I would need everything ahead of time. I may snag a set just have seeing it may be a year or two it explodes and who knows if these will be around by then

jakesz28
05-01-2013, 08:57 PM
I thought I would be cutting mine apart already. But it drove 1250 miles I wheeled it for 7 days and drove it another 1250 miles to come home. Only damage was the cp undercarriage protection got pushed closer to the transmission.

alrock
05-02-2013, 12:48 AM
Chris, this is something you need to start slowly gathering in your garage as 4speed suggested. Spread the cost out over a year or two.

06 H3
05-02-2013, 03:21 AM
Thats the plan, There is no way in hell I could dish out all the money at once. I will start accumulating parts slowly. Goal is 4.56 geared D44 to avoid regearing right away then copy the front suspension CJ has. He has had less ride quality complaints then the coilover T I saw last weekend. I have a few other ideas but it will be a process. Kind of like starting with the stock H3, things will slowly be changed and added.

I have always like airbags, way before I knew what the scorpion was. After seeing air bags in action I would love to run some.

Who knows, by the time I get all the parts it will be over a year out from now and by then we may have more IFS upgraded parts and it wont be needed. What ever direction I go i'm sure I will have fun with the modification process, I always do.

Scarsman
05-02-2013, 04:06 AM
Ah ha! Now I see what those brackets were for! Looks like a great kit!

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk

4speedfunk
05-02-2013, 08:26 AM
Ah ha! Now I see what those brackets were for
Yup...this is them after some additional machining. We'll be making some minor dimensional adjustments on the next batch...I'll let you know when the time comes. I thought I would pitch a few of em and see how much action I get. These are not listed on the THORparts website, and I really want some input from other SAS guys before I make them in any large quantities. I think H3 owners & modifications are in a transitional stage right now. Original owners are selling off and newbs are buying up used ones and putting em on the trails. Price and odometer readings are approaching the point where the SAS is becoming a more realistic option for a lot of off-roaders. Its a big undertaking but, the results are worth it.


this is something you need to start slowly gathering in your garage...Spread the cost out over a year or two.
Absolutely. I can put together a complete SAS kit in a box. But, I don't think anyone would buy it due to the "lump sum price". I am all about low-buck, and buiding it like alrock says allows you to add to your parts pile as funds become available, instead of dropping thousands at one time.

silvrzuki77
05-14-2013, 11:38 AM
Looks awesome!!! You stated there is a large bearing versus small? Is this depending on which axle you use?

4speedfunk
05-14-2013, 02:26 PM
Sort of. Rather than bore the hell out of everyone with a break-down of GM Dana 44s'...I'll just say that the 3/4-ton (8-lug) version is the best one to build up. They have larger-bearing spindles, big 3" tubes, and big beefy shafts. These are commonly called "Dana 44 HD" axles, and that name implies they are something special. In reality...they came in all 3/4-ton GM trucks & Suburbans...hardly rare or worthy of a HD moniker.

If you have a 1/2-ton GM Dana 44, the story gets more complicated. Before 77...these axles used small-bearing spindles, smaller 2.75" tubes, and wimpy shafts. After 77...most of the 1/2-ton axles were upgraded with big-tubes, shafts, and bearings...essentially becoming a 6-lug version of the heavier-duty 3/4-ton axle. I say "most" because not all 1/2-ton trucks got the upgrades. Post 77 Suburbans always have the big tubes, and post 77 Blazers almost always have the small tubes up until 81 or so. So after 77...there is very little difference between the 3/4t and 1/2t Dana 44 axles...especially if it came from a Suburban. If you have an early 1/2-ton Dana...don't panic. The shafts and spindles can both be upgraded to the later style parts. The only thing that can't be upgraded is the small axle tubes. True...bigger is better but there's nothing wrong with using a small-tube, early Dana 1/2-ton housing. I've got one in my H3 right now.

Regardless of your axle...I have ABS hubs (and spindles, if needed) to fit either the small or large bearing rig. There's technically nothing wrong with the small-bearing rig...its just a tad more scarce because they only made them for the first 3-years. Any and all parts will interchange from 3/4t to 1/2t versions, and they are the same width housing. Here's the two spindles side by side...

10644

silvrzuki77
06-01-2013, 05:56 PM
Hey thanks for the info!! Sorry I didnt respond earlier but I appreciate it. Once i get a few projects done and i find a axle I will be ordering a kit!

silvrzuki77
06-07-2013, 11:37 AM
Will got a axle yesterday lol really random. It was in a show truck 2002 chevy 1500 with no driveshaft hooked up too it. Soo not sure the year, 6 lug, horrible homemade high steer arm on it, and its even painted shiny blue with a chrome diff cover. As soon as i finish the Teardrop i will pick up a kit from you just to have.

4speedfunk
06-07-2013, 05:50 PM
That sounds sufficiently gay! If it was rolling under a 2002 Silverado, it would most likely be a drivers-side drop. In which case...you're sort of screwed putting it into an H3. Shoot me a pic and I'll tell you what you got...and where to go from there.

p.s. How's the trailer build?

silvrzuki77
06-07-2013, 07:35 PM
Sorry did confirm it was a 2wd chevy with a 10" lift it's a passenger drop. Not my first rodeo lol. Even has a custom 1/8th plate box high steer arm lol. Least i know the axle wasnt beat on! Ill post a pic in all of its blueness tomorrow.

Trailer moving aling finishing the hatch partly tomorrow

06 H3
06-07-2013, 07:37 PM
far from silvrzukis first rodeo...you had built up a nice sammy.

silvrzuki77
06-07-2013, 07:39 PM
Lol where did you see a pic of that? I miss that rig!! My dad bought it brand new in 88 and I ruined it lol.

4speedfunk
06-07-2013, 09:07 PM
Ahhh...then its most likely a GM housing. You're good to go.

06 H3
06-08-2013, 03:42 AM
Lol where did you see a pic of that? I miss that rig!! My dad bought it brand new in 88 and I ruined it lol.

I saw a pic of it a while ago. Didn't you post one when u joined up or something? Andrew also told me about it, you linked it and set it up really nice.

Sounds like I'm heading down the same road as you, my dad bought new in 05 leased it for a few years then bought it out slowly wheeling the piss out of it.

Not sure where to stop though....keep going and just try to keep it in good condition and fix damage or basically make it into a buggy

silvrzuki77
06-09-2013, 06:05 PM
Here is my pretty blue 44!!!
http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k266/silvrzuki77/null_zps7ea86a97.jpg
Have no idea what gears are inside lol its a mystery!

4speedfunk
06-09-2013, 06:56 PM
Looks like a 73-77 small-tube? Same thing I'm currently running.

P.S. Flat top...check.
High-steer arm...check.
Cast cover...check.

Nice find. To check the gearing...simply rotate the yoke and count the number of yoke turns it takes to complete one full turn of the rotors. Most likely its a 3.08 or 3.73.

I'm currently working a 3-link bracket kit for this housing. It will locate all the attachment points to take the guesswork out of mounting it in an H3. It will include (axle) the lower link mounts, spring pads, upper link tower, and track-bar mount. Additionally I can provide (frame) lower link mounts, upper link mount, inboard track-bar mount, coil-spring buckets, link-arms, track-bar, and coil springs. This stuff (along with the ABS hubs) would be everything you need to build your own SA front suspension. Steering system, shocks, brake lines, and other minor items would still need to be tracked down but at least these parts would get your H3 back on the ground with minimal downtime and head-scratching.

silvrzuki77
06-09-2013, 08:34 PM
Yeah I assumed smaller tube and 3.somethibg gearing. Is your link kit going to be running coils or coilovers? Looking forward to seeing a prototype on that!!! Hopefully longer arms versus copying somewhat of a jeep setup. I 3 linked my old samurai and it worked awesome.

4speedfunk
06-10-2013, 05:34 PM
Is your link kit going to be running coils or coilovers?
This will be a coil-spring kit. However the difference between a coil/shock arrangement and a coil-over would be very minor....literally just replace the spring pads with shock-mounts. The links and mounting points would be the same for either type.


Hopefully longer arms versus copying somewhat of a jeep setup.
Nope...its actually very close to a Jeep setup. The problem with the Jeep suspension, occurs after you lift it. You end up using 40% of the "articulation range" just to achieve static ride-height. So when they droop...everything swings way outta whack. I've seen some short-arm XJs running 5" of lift using stock lower mounts, and the angle looks horrible! I'm sure the road manners are pretty harsh too. For this reason the long-arm is the way to go on a 5"+ Jeep because you have to compensate for starting at 40% of your suspension design. Now go crawl under a stock Jeep and look at the angles. They're actually ideal! That's what I was shooting for.

My links are actually quite short. Even though I'm using short arms...the lower link angles are very mild (nearly flat). The upper link is actually running uphill when the vehicle is at rest...sort of tucked-up high beside the oil pan. So even with 6" of lift over stock...the suspension is sitting relatively low in its range of movement...0% (like a stock Jeep). Essentially, on the H3 you're building your suspension with the 6" of lift already accounted for. This is a huge advantage over a short-arm Jeep where you use up 40% of your suspension just to obtain static lift. That creates all kinds of problems (and the need for longer arms).

On a solid axle H3 things are tad different. Because you're building it from scratch...you don't need to waste a bunch of your "articulation range" just to get lift. You simply build the suspension so it starts its cycle with 6" of lift...at 0% (not 40%). Because of the mild angles...long arms are not really needed. Also...its drives, handles, and reacts like it should. Even the track bar angle is very mild, which means there is almost no bump-steer at all. Its very much a Jeep setup...A STOCK ONE!

06 H3
06-17-2013, 02:27 AM
Nope...its actually very close to a Jeep setup. The problem with the Jeep suspension, occurs after you lift it. You end up using 40% of the "articulation range" just to achieve static ride-height. So when they droop...everything swings way outta whack. I've seen some short-arm XJs running 5" of lift using stock lower mounts, and the angle looks horrible! I'm sure the road manners are pretty harsh too. For this reason the long-arm is the way to go on a 5"+ Jeep because you have to compensate for starting at 40% of your suspension design. Now go crawl under a stock Jeep and look at the angles. They're actually ideal! That's what I was shooting for.

My links are actually quite short. Even though I'm using short arms...the lower link angles are very mild (nearly flat). The upper link is actually running uphill when the vehicle is at rest...sort of tucked-up high beside the oil pan. So even with 6" of lift over stock...the suspension is sitting relatively low in its range of movement...0% (like a stock Jeep). Essentially, on the H3 you're building your suspension with the 6" of lift already accounted for. This is a huge advantage over a short-arm Jeep where you use up 40% of your suspension just to obtain static lift. That creates all kinds of problems (and the need for longer arms).

On a solid axle H3 things are tad different. Because you're building it from scratch...you don't need to waste a bunch of your "articulation range" just to get lift. You simply build the suspension so it starts its cycle with 6" of lift...at 0% (not 40%). Because of the mild angles...long arms are not really needed. Also...its drives, handles, and reacts like it should. Even the track bar angle is very mild, which means there is almost no bump-steer at all. Its very much a Jeep setup...A STOCK ONE!

Cant believe I missed this, but yea your dead on. I know this will sound somewhat ridiculous but I think its very true. When doing solid axle swaps or suspension mods sometimes it actually helps to use a vehicle that was designed with the opposite intentions of the modifications you are making. Ill start with the rear, I know I know, I ramble on over a stupid simple spring over but I get very excited because its easy and it works, very well might I add. You take a vehicle that is spring over stock, now you want to lift it, you throw on these huge tall arched springs that ride stiff and dont have much downtravel because you started with a stock spring that was flat. Now you take an H3 or a spring under vehicle, you have a nice soft suspension with somewhat flat springs and offer a good amount of downtravel when sprung over. While it required some modifying its totally worth it.

Now talk about the front end, same goes with what CJ was talking about with the 3 link, you are starting flat at 5-6in of lift at 8in of lift (too tall IMO) you have a slight angle but compared to a jeep you can get so much lift and near perfect stock like angles. Again its takes work but I think its worth it, why? you dont have to chase down problems...you build it once the way you want, adjust things and then your good. On my brothers JK hes running a 4.5 in lift to reduce the stock control arm angle he has these drop brackets, does it ride better then before? yea, but you lose clearance, so now when he tackles tougher trails he needs to upgrade to long arm to keep that flat angle, and avoid getting hung up. I drooped out his suspension when installing some coil spacers to compensate for the sagging with the winch and bumper and his trackbar is severely limiting his flex. Why? because he added a truss, mismatched the suspension track bar bracket with the truss trackbar brackets and now he needs to adjust things.

In the end, can I help him make all this work? Yea, but its a constant trace back to what needs adjustments now...so what do you get with a vehicle that has a totally different suspension then you want? Well you make it the way you want, adjust and make everything work the way you want from the beginning, you get a vehicle that is unique not the typical heep. Its a good bit of work but for me I see it being worth it. Others go for the typical jeep because they would rather chase down problems with the ease of kits and aftermarket. Theres no right or wrong way but I personally see it as fun and a way to build your own **** from scratch and make it the way you want.

4speedfunk
06-17-2013, 09:24 AM
If you look at a bone stock Jeep 4 link...they really are very well though-out, and they work great right off the show-room floor. The problem is...very few of us even notice or care about a stock Jeep suspension. They sit way too low for big tires, so naturally the first thing most of us want to do is lift it...and that's where the problems start. I tried to stay close to the stock Jeep design...no sense to re-invent the wheel. Jeep has millions and millions of these driving around, and my hats off to them for staying true to the SA design, thru many different owners, recessions, and hard times. I copied the hell out of many Jeeps I saw on the internet...if you study it long enough, it becomes clear what works and what doesn't work when building your own.

The H3 has HUGE wheelwells compared to everything else out there...so that is one hurdle you don't have to deal with (like an XJ or ZJ). Also there are very few choices on where to locate the link mounts. In fact...the only place to attach links to the frame is where I put them, (it made the decision very easy!). The angles and lengths end up being very similar to a stock Jeep rig....I'de call it a "mid-arm", longer than a stock Jeep but not a true "long-arm". It has the same height and clearance as a 6"-lifted Jeep...but the suspension angles of a stock one.

Recon is running similar lengths & angles, although his track-bar and steering are quite different. He's running coil-overs too, so its definitely a high-end rig compared to mine. But, we share the same (nearly identical) link arrangement, and I've seen his rig flexed all over the place...way beyond what I built mine for. This geometry works. I'm currently building a complete H3 3-link on the work bench, and I'll post-up some pics and dimensions when I get it all assembled.

Brien W
02-20-2016, 08:27 PM
So you want a solid axle in your H3? Grab a GM Dana 44...grab on of these kits...and start cutting!

These hubs come with ABS rings pre-installed and caliper brackets that allow you to bolt your H3 brakes to the Dana 44 of your choice. The brackets accept stock ABS sensors, and the 12mm studs even allow you to keep your stock rotors and lug-nuts. Don't do a hack-job! Don't settle for 70s-era brakes! Keep your ABS, TCS, and Stabilitrac functioning. I have several sets available in large and small bearing versions. For use with GM/Jeep spindles. $400 (including $50 core for 6-lug hubs).

http://www.hummer4x4offroad.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=10396&stc=1
Please send me the info to purchase a kit. I'm gearing up to do a swap after destroying my weak front diff.
Thanks

4speedfunk
02-21-2016, 12:10 PM
PM sent!